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School

Two years ago, after a wonderful experience with a private pre-K program, we started the process of trying to find a place for Collin in the public school system. 

From the beginning, we determined that the most important thing for ensuring an effective educational experience was an instructional assistant who knew Collin well enough to read his cues and respond appropriately. We made this clear from the start and again at every step in the long, long road. We met with resistance at first, but chose to wait it out with as much patience and kindness as we could muster while still sticking to our guns.

So when, 18 months into the process, an instructional assistant was approved to work with Collin at school, we were thrilled. The job opening was posted and someone who knows Collin very well, who has worked with him in both home and educational settings for years, applied for the job and got called in for an interview.

Did this person get hired? No, she did not. Someone "better qualified" was chosen.

Could anyone in any position of authority explain to me how the chosen candidate was better qualified for the position? No, they could not. The only information I got was that the other candidate has more experience in the school system.

And at any point in the process did someone contact us to say, "We know that you feel very strongly about this, but we think another option might be better"? No, they did not. The school chose someone with no knowledge of Collin and didn't even tell us about it. I found out through another avenue.

We were being asked to trust a panel of people whom we didn't know and who didn't know Collin in their decision to choose a person with no experience with Collin to be his primary caregiver and facilitator at school. And our first opportunity to meet the assistant would be two days before school starts. No one we spoke with could/would answer any of our questions about the process, the decision, or the candidate and dismissed every concern with an "I understand your frustration."

So, after two years of meetings and phone calls and paperwork and hoping and hoping and hoping, we withdrew Collin from school.

Parents in our situation, who have children with a wide range of disabilities and no verbal communication, approach school in all different ways and I deeply respect those decisions. This was just the approach we chose and I still believe it was and is the best for us.

So, today I am returning Collin's school uniforms to the store. My heart wrenches thinking of his cousins and friends starting school without him and I'm avoiding back-to-school advertisements. After a few more days of being sad, I will regroup and start to think about what's next -- how to continue to give Collin what he needs in a way that's best for him.